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More than 1,400: the number of people that work for INAF, made-up of researchers (including research students and post-docs), technicians and administrative staff, that make everything possible. 19: the number of national research institutes, and one in the Canaries which operates the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. 91 million euro: the basic operational fund assigned to INAF. Divided by the number of employees (or researchers) this corresponds to a pro capite basic operating grant which is amongst the lowest of the research organisations overseen by the MIUR (ministry of research). 200: the number of international research institutes that collaborate with INAF. Between 3,000 and 4,000 (8-11 a day): the scientific publications (articles, posters, popular articles) written by INAF researchers each year. 13: the number of INAF or INAF-associated researchers who appear in the list of "Highly Cited" Italian scientists in all disciplines (including the president and three members of the "Consiglio Scientifico" - the scientific advisory panel). 10 terabytes, equivalent to 2,000 DVDs: INAF's digital astronomical data archive. The archive grows by 55 gigabytes (12 DVDs) per day. 13 billion light years: the distance to the most distant object observed by an INAF researcher; a world record. It's a gamma ray burst produced by the explosion of a star when the Universe was only 5% of its current age. 1.3 billion kilometres: the distance to the farthest INAF instrument. This is VIMS, the spectrometer on-board the Cassini probe in orbit around Saturn. 34,000 square metres: the combined surface area of INAF's radio telescopes; the same as Piazza San Giovanni in Laterano in Rome, able to host a million people. Each parabola is able to detect the radio signal from a mobile phone on the Moon, 400,000 kilometres away. 2,000: the number of gamma ray bursts discovered by space missions in which Italy participates, 1,300 of which by the "made in Italy" satellites Beppo Sax and AGILE. 125,000: the number of ancient volumes of physics and astronomy in INAF's historic libraries, including twenty or so incunabula, books from the end of the 15th century, amongst the first printed using the movable type invented by Gutenberg.

FATE: forecasting optical turbulence to push the Very Large Telescope to its full potential

May 29, 2024

FATE: forecasting optical turbulence to push the Very Large Telescope to its full potential The FATE project began in November 2022 and entered the commissioning phase in September - December 2023. Once completed, it will enter in the operational phase in which ESO will be able to optimise observing strategies for the VLT and start planning those for ELT

MeerKAT+: the MeerKAT Extension

Feb 21, 2024

MeerKAT+: the MeerKAT Extension The handover of the first dish of the MeerKAT extension signals an important milestone for the SKA-MID construction

The first discoveries of the Webb space telescope in Rome: public lecture on 29 February

Feb 21, 2024

The first discoveries of the Webb space telescope in Rome: public lecture on 29 February On Thursday 29 February at 6 pm, Prof. Roberto Maiolino of the University of Cambridge (UK) will hold a public lecture on the theme "The invisible Universe revealed by the James Webb Space Telescope" at the Department of Physics of Sapienza University of Rome