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Under 35

A great deal of attention has been given to the training and research activities of young researchers: in fact, on 20th October 2010, 65 research grants and 46 studentships were advertised, for training, research and post-doc fellowships. In particular, in 2009, about 700,000 euro were allocated for the first 8 two-year INAF post-docs at an international level, that, given their success, were offered also in 2010. INAF, then, makes a small contribution to keeping young researchers in Italy and making others return from abroad, as part of a process that reflects the international nature of research. INAF, in collaboration with ISSNAF has also promoted study trips to the United States for undergraduates interested in astronomy and astrophysics. INAF and its researchers are particularly active in seeking "external" funding and resources, applying for national and international grants both as an institute and as individual researchers. Currently, two of INAF's researchers enjoy an ERC Starting Grant and a third has recently won an Excellence Grant.

Studying the birth of exoplanets with chemistry

Sep 23, 2022

Studying the birth of exoplanets with chemistry A new study led by Elenia Pacetti, PhD student at La Sapienza University and INAF, jointly uses ultra-volatile, volatile, and refractory elements in the atmospheres of giant planets to develop a unified method to shed light on how and where giant planets form. The new work, published in The Astrophysical Journal, paves the road to the exoplanetary studies of the ESA mission Ariel

Stellar evolution along the HR diagram with Gaia

Sep 21, 2022

Stellar evolution along the HR diagram with Gaia The hybrid workshop started its activities in the INAF National Auditorium “Ernesto Capocci” of the Capodimonte Astronomical Observatory in Naples

The discovery of an extremely energetic gamma-ray burst from the infant Universe

Sep 21, 2022

The discovery of an extremely energetic gamma-ray burst from the infant Universe An international effort led by INAF researcher Andrea Rossi discovered and followed up the gamma-ray burst GRB 210905A, one of the most luminous events ever recorded that exploded when our Universe was just less than 900 million years old