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Istituto italiano di astrofisica - national institute for astrophisics

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You are here: Home INAF News Fermionic dark matter in our Galactic core?

Fermionic dark matter in our Galactic core?

The anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury around our Sun led to the greatest change of paradigm of physics thanks to the conception of General Relativity by Albert Einstein. The multi-year, high-quality data recording the motion of the closest objects around the compact source at the Galactic center, Sgr A*, led to the verification of the predicted gravitational redshift, to the anomalous precession of S2, as well as to the anomalous fly-by of G2. This heralds a fermionic dark matter dense core interpretation of the nature of Sgr A*, traditionally interpreted as a black hole.

A new neutral fermion of 56 keV, a dark matter “ino”, for short a “darkino”, is basic to this alternative approach. New perspectives are open 1) to the understanding of the predominance of dark matter in our Galaxy and in the large scale of the Universe, 2) to formulate a new paradigm for identifying the seed for the formation of ten-billion-solar-masses black holes in active galactic nuclei, and 3) to address the fundamental physics of the darkinos which, together with the neutrinos, appear to have a fundamental role in accounting for a large portion of the Universe mass-energy.

These results are presented in the new article appearing on 9 September 2020, in Astronomy & Astrophysics, co-authored by E.A. Becerra-Vergara, C.R. Arguelles, A. Krut, J.A. Rueda, and R. Ruffini.

Adapted from the ICRANET press release.

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ALMA shed light on the chemical composition of a protoplanetary disk

Oct 09, 2020

ALMA shed light on the chemical composition of a protoplanetary disk The team led by Linda Podio, a researcher at INAF, observed a protoplanetary disk of less than 1 million years, which is almost edge-on. The edge-on geometry allowed observing the vertical structure of the disk and to resolve distinct chemical layers. The images obtained thanks to ALMA revealed emission from several molecules. One of these is methanol, a key molecule for the formation of the so-called “complex organic molecules”