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Istituto italiano di astrofisica - national institute for astrophisics

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VST beyond 2021

From Apr 2022 the INAF-ESO agreement for the VST operations in Paranal will expire, and INAF will gain full ownership of the telescope. To explore the various options, INAF has appointed a working group to review the scientific potential of the VST telescope and to present to the INAF management the potential options on the future of telecope operations

VST (an acronym for VLT Survey Telescope) is one of the largest telescopes in the world designed for wide-field surveys in the optical bands. The telescope has a 2.6-m aperture and is equipped with a single dedicated focal plane instrument: OmegaCAM, which is sensitive in the optical (0.3 - 1.0 microns) range over a 1 square degree field of view.

From Apr 2022 the INAF-ESO agreement for the VST operations in Paranal will expire, and INAF will gain full ownership of the telescope.

To explore the various options, INAF has appointed a working group "VST beyond 2021" to review the scientific potential of the VST telescope and to present to the INAF management the potential options on the future of telecope operations.

For more information:

  • visit the web section VST beyond 2021 maintained by INAF Scientific Directorate

FIRST IMAGE OF A REGION OF THE MILKY WAY FROM THE PEGASUS SURVEY

Jan 16, 2023

FIRST IMAGE OF A REGION OF THE MILKY WAY FROM THE PEGASUS SURVEY Led by INAF and Macquarie University, a portion of our Galaxy has been imaged in great detail as part of the PEGASUS survey - a radio astronomy project designed to discover more about the Milky Way

Studying the birth of exoplanets with chemistry

Sep 23, 2022

Studying the birth of exoplanets with chemistry A new study led by Elenia Pacetti, PhD student at La Sapienza University and INAF, jointly uses ultra-volatile, volatile, and refractory elements in the atmospheres of giant planets to develop a unified method to shed light on how and where giant planets form. The new work, published in The Astrophysical Journal, paves the road to the exoplanetary studies of the ESA mission Ariel