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Quantum detectors for the CMB

One field seeing a very rapid evolution, in which Italian groups were included from the very start and are obtaining prominent results, is that which uses KIDs, Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

Kinetic Inductance Detectors are the latest generation of detectors based on the presence of a gap between the energy levels of a superconductor. This is analogous to what happens in semiconductor detectors, but the gap in the case of superconductors is about one thousand times smaller, allowing for the detection of much lower frequency photons (down to about 90 GHz).

The characteristic that makes these detectors ideal candidates for future balloon or satellite missions is the possibility to read even 104-105 pixels via a single coaxial cable and a wide band HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifier, enormously reducing the thermal load on the cryogenic stage of the experiment.

In addition, the manufacturing process is relatively simple and flexible, feasible in Italian facilities, and the freedom in the choice of materials allows KIDs to be used for wavelengths that go from the millimetre to the X-ray band.

Olivier Le Fevre - in memoriam

Jun 26, 2020

Olivier Le Fevre - in memoriam On June 25, the astronomer Olivier Le Fevre passed away

Magnetic tornadoes in the Sun’s atmosphere

Jun 26, 2020

Magnetic tornadoes in the Sun’s atmosphere A team of researchers led by Mariarita Murabito (INAF) that includes scientists of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and the Warwick University has provided the first observational proof that solar tornadoes are produced by swirling magnetic fields

Ultraviolet light vs. COVID19: from the Sun to artificial lamps the germicidal power of ultraviolet rays against the pandemic

Jun 15, 2020

Ultraviolet light vs. COVID19: from the Sun to artificial lamps the germicidal power of ultraviolet rays against the pandemic Results of a study carried out by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) and the University of Milan, in collaboration with Istituto Nazionale Tumori and the Don Gnocchi Foundation of Milan, demonstrate the high germicidal power of short ultraviolet radiation (UV-C) on SARS-COV-2 coronavirus. This result has important public health implications on the strategies to be adopted to manage the pandemic and clearly explain how decontamination and sterilization protocols to prevent SARS-Cov-2 infection must be designed. Notably, taking off from these results a second study explains the role of Sun-derived UV-B/A in conditioning the epidemiology and the worldwide evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic