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Experimental radio, microwaves and gravitation

Instrumental activity at radio wavelengths involves two, partially overlapping, scientific communities in Italy, with different scientific objectives. Radio astronomy uses, above all, coherent receivers connected to digital electronic systems for the analysis of the converted signal, on ground-based telescopes with ever larger collecting areas. To increase further the baselines of interferometric systems, possible space missions are being studied.

The study of the CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background), that is, the first light in the Universe, is today carried out using coherent (radio), incoherent (bolometers) and cryogenic quantum receivers, for ground-based telescopes, balloons (Boomerang), and space missions (Planck). Lastly, gravitational experiments using radio science are carried out with interplanetary probes, using, above all, precise radio tracking measurements.

K2-3: A system of three likely sub-Neptunes

Mar 22, 2018

K2-3: A system of three likely sub-Neptunes A team led by astronomers from INAF presented a new study aimed at determining accurate masses for the three planets in orbit aroud the M-dwarf star K2-3

INAF hosts the preliminary round to set up the Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory-ERIC

Feb 14, 2018

INAF hosts the preliminary round to set up  the Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory-ERIC At Headquarters of the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics INAF, the kick-off round of the multilateral negotiations to establish an ERIC organization to the manage the Cherenkov Telescope Array project as part of the EU’s ESFRI infrastructure roadmap had take place

Extrasolar planets: Italy to lead the construction of the SHARK instruments on the LBT

Jan 24, 2018

Extrasolar planets: Italy to lead the construction of the SHARK instruments on the LBT The Italian institutes involved in the construction of SHARK are the INAF Observatories of Padua and Rome, responsible for the two channels, together with the Observatories of Arcetri, Milan and Trieste and the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Padua